Archive for December 2017

It Just Would Not Be Christmas Without Him

December 29, 2017

Dr. Steven J. Callis


These recent weeks have been filled with shopping, seasonal music, pageants, programs, Christmas goodies, cantatas, lights, trees, decorations, special parties and meals.  Thinking about family traditions of the season, complete this thought:  “It just would not be Christmas without…”

Presents.  Based on the time we spend shopping and wrapping, and the register in the checkbook, this is a huge part of the Christmas celebration.  At some point in life we make the transition to finding more pleasure in the giving than in the receiving.  Either way, the gift exchange is crucial.

Music.  Christmas songs have a way of lifting our spirits and putting a smile on our faces.  From the sentimental “I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas” to the hilarity of “Santa Looked a Lot Like Daddy,” song writers have collectively expressed the desires of our hearts and the merriment of the season.

Christmas Tree.  For most of us, Christmas morning is centered around the tree, covered with lights and ornaments and special decorations.  Beautifully wrapped presents find their place beneath it.  Until that time, we enjoy moments of gazing at the twinkling lights in anticipation of what is to come.  Such as it was, even Charlie Brown just had to have a tree.

Foods and sweets.  I remember my grandmother’s annual baking of her Christmas divinity and her delicious chocolate fudge; what a treat.  Will you enjoy the traditional Christmas ham again this year?  My choice never reaches the table, but those Italian Christmas trees always sound good to me (pepperoni pizza slices!)

My dad always enjoyed giving ‘gag’ gifts at Christmas, and blaming it on “St. Nick” or “The Jolly Fat Guy,” or “Santa.”  We have tried to continue the tradition, but Christmas somehow is not quite the same without my dad and his pranks.  Oh, how he loved the Christmas season!

In reality, however, it is Christmas even though dad is no longer with us.  Believe it or not, we can have Christmas without the music, and the presents, and the festive decorations, and the goodies, and the gags.  The reason it is Christmas is because Jesus was born.  God chose to lay aside His “God-ness” and take the form of a servant, teaching mankind how to love.

He still comes into our crowded, frustrated, confused, world that is bent towards egotistical living, selfish motives, and ungodly intentions.  He still chooses to live right in the midst of the messes and crises and fears of your life, guiding your steps and thoughts to the extent that you allow Him to do so.

I remember times of my childhood that we would tear open the gifts in a matter of only a few minutes, and then I would sit back and briefly experience the empty feeling that comes when I realized that the anticipation far outweighed the gifting.  I did not realize at such a young age the reason for such a let down, and I quickly ignored it ands began playing with the presents and calling friends on the phone to see what they received for Christmas.  Looking back, however, I know the reason for the emptiness: there is one place in each of us that only Jesus can fill.

Far too many people will awaken on Christmas morning and attempt to have Christmas without Jesus.  They may find temporary satisfaction, and a passing form of happiness; but He is the one who makes Christmas real.  In Christ is lasting joy and peace.  It just would not be Christmas without Him!


Longing for a Silent Night

December 15, 2017

by Dr. Steven J. Callis

I love to sing the carol, though I am uncertain as to the accuracy of the title.  Nothing about the night itself was holy; except that God chose that time to enter the world with the ultimate solution to the sin and degradation that had disrupted the peace it was created to enjoy.  He brought holy to the ordinary.  The real questionable word in the title is that first word: Silent.

First, Scripture tells us that the town of Bethlehem was filled to overflowing with people.  It was toe-to-heal traffic walking through the marketplace.  There were no vacancies to be found in any of the hotels.  Crowds of people scurrying here and there will make noise!

Add to that the reason they were there in the first place.  As we might imagine, many people were disgruntled at the necessity of travel and a government-mandated enrollment.  Rome was the political center of the world at that time, and the ‘census’ was ordered, in part, to force universal allegiance to Emperor Augustus.  People traveled long distances to fulfill this decree; a pleasure trip it was not.

Mary and Joseph found a resting place in a dwelling meant for animals.  Animals are sometimes noisy, and often smelly.  This certainly was not the ideal atmosphere for bringing a baby into the world.  Further, most of our Christmas hymns highlight the role of the angels announcing the birth of the Christ; at one point, a multitude of angels, singing loud and strong in grand celebration.

No, God probably did not enter the world on a silent night.  In fact, it makes more sense that the One bringing peace to the world would do so at a time when peace was absent.  He came to a world in need of something it could not find or produce on its own.

People who are famous in the public eye have lived under the proverbial microscope for centuries, so it is nothing new.  With the significant and rapid development of our technological world, however, I cannot remember in my lifetime when nearly every action and every statement made by influential people – including those on both sides of the political aisle – is judged, criticized, and protested in a public, widespread forum.  Our society has become more selfish, spoiled, and vocal when they are not rewarded, which leads to a divided, restless, frustrated nation.  We are in a mess, and levels of tolerance are quickly diminishing.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow voiced our perplexity in the third stanza of his poem, I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day:  “And in despair I bowed my head.  ‘There is no peace on earth,’ I said, ‘for hate is strong and mocks the song of peace on earth, good will to men.’ ”

But the next stanza rings out with hope, “Then pealed the bells more loud and deep: God is not dead, nor doth He sleep; the wrong shall fail, the right prevail, with peace on earth, good will to men.”

No, our world is not silent.  It is still a dark place much of the time.  There is sadness, fear, pain, and loneliness.  Just as God’s pure love could shine brightly on that first Christmas night, so He continues to come into our darkness, bringing peace and joy for all people.  No matter who you are, or where you have been, or what you have done, God’s redeeming grace is available for you.  Jesus, our Savior, the Prince of Peace, is born.

Things to Do while You Wait

December 11, 2017

by Dr. Steven J. Callis

WAIT! …So, how did you do?  Generally speaking, our society performs poorly when it comes to waiting.  During the summers of my college days, most of the correspondence with my girlfriend (the lady I eventually married!) was by written letter; addressed, stamped, and mailed via USPS.  By the time it reached her two or three days later, any news it contained was past news!

The amazing development of electronic mail made it possible to for people communicate more quickly.  Then along came cell phones and text messaging, and e-mail became the new snail mail!  If we do not receive a response to our text within a couple of minutes, we become antsy.  We do not like to wait!

Nevertheless, we are forced do it several times everyday.  Shopping lines, traffic lights, health facilities, restaurants, medical test results, television commercials that interrupt our favorite shows…as much time as we spend waiting, one would think we might be better at it than we are.

In fact, it has been estimated that the average person spends seven years of life waiting!  Can you imagine that?  So, what do you do while you wait?

Many people go to their trusty, handy cell phone.  In a doctor’s office waiting room this morning I noticed that more than one half of those waiting for their name to be called were using their electronic devices.  Were they playing games, sending messages, or maybe searching the internet?

I often take something with me to read, but today I decided to leaf through a magazine that was provided by the doctor’s office.  I have never really looked closely at a People’s Magazine, so this was an opportunity to do so.  After several pages I realized that I was already familiar with most of the information I was seeing.  I glanced back at the cover and saw the date:  December 4, 2007!

And most of us have waited patiently (or not!) at a green traffic light for the person in front of us to look up and see that the red light had changed. It causes me to wonder if the field of chiropractic will become much more lucrative and in demand in the near future because of how much time we spend looking down or hunched over peering into that small handheld screen.

The Christmas season – Advent – is a time of anticipation, of expectant waiting for the coming of Christ.  It is a time to prepare for the spiritual side of the vastly celebrated holiday.  It is a time that we seek to draw closer to Jesus and invite Him to draw nearer to us.

At the birth of Jesus that first Christmas, the religious world had been waiting for 800 years from the time it was prophesied that Messiah would come.  We can understand, then, why Magi would travel nearly 1,000 miles to worship the newborn King, shepherds would leave their posts, and angels would joyfully declare, “Glory to God in the highest…peace to all people.”  The waiting was over.

God still comes to His creation.  No, not as a baby; but He chooses to be involved in the lives of humankind.  Those who seek Him find that He comes every day to make Himself known, to extend His mercy and grace, and to express His love.

This is Advent.  What will you do while you wait?  Certainly you will do some shopping and gift wrapping and eating – but will you take time to truly seek the God of our salvation?  Will you endeavor to make room for Him in the busyness of the season?  Will you notice it when He comes to you?